Blog Archives

Wanted: Advocates, Victims, Writers, Volunteers


Let’s kick this up a notch.  I haven’t written much on my blog lately and I am now ready to get back at it in full force in the very near future.

I need your help. I’m looking for folks who’d be interested in:

  • writing for Elder Advocates and the cause in general
  • volunteering
  • joining the “think tank”
  • telling a personal experience

I am so grateful to see that the site I started many years ago has almost 23,000 views.  Just imagine what more is in store.

Contact me from link in main menu with subject line “No Mo.”

Something is taking place to bring light to Elder Abuse & Guardianship Abuse.

Advertisements

Revocation of Powers of Attorney


Off the Top o' My Head

Powers of attorney have been mentioned or discussed in this blog several times.  “Powers of Attorney
and “Weaknesses in Powers of Attorney,” in particular, explained the importance of a well-drafted power of attorney.  An aspect that has not been discussed is revocation.

The ability to revoke a power of attorney is a major advantage over court-ordered guardianship or conservatorship (guardianship of the person’s worldly estate).  A principal who signs a power of attorney may revoke it at any time.  A legally-incapacitated person, and even a person who consented to guardianship, cannot revoke the guardian’s appointment.  He or she must file a petition with the court to terminate the guardianship.  It can be very difficult to persuade the court to terminate a guardianship.  Many judges are very paternalistic and in many courts persons who are subject to the authority of a guardian or conservator have very few…

View original post 163 more words

Be an advocate for your aging loved one.


We must be the eyes, ears & voice for our elders.

Living: the ultimate team sport

If your loved one no longer has a voice in which to defend or advocate for herself, who better to do so than you?

In this post I will assume that your loved one, e.g., parent, grandparent, spouse, or sibling, lives in a long-term care (LTC) facility.  Oftentimes by the time our parent has entered a facility, we are so relieved that someone else has taken over the caregiving, we willingly take a back seat and let the professionals do their job.  By all means, reward yourself with the freedom that less active caregiving of your loved one has afforded you, but don’t leave your caregiving role behind.

I know it’s hard to hear what I’m about to say – especially since you finally turned over your parent’s caregiving to someone else – but I want to encourage you to NOT assume that the care being provided (or withheld) is…

View original post 620 more words

%d bloggers like this: